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Department of Linguistics

SPEECH PHYSIOLOGY

Electropalatography (EPG)


Click here to view some notes on electropalatography.

Make sure that you watch the main EPG video. Also provided here are two additional short animated movies, e1.mov and e2.mov, that further illustrate the operation of an electropalatograph. (These two movies should play if your computer is already able to display the main EPG movie).

In this workshop we examine the utterance:-

"Kate Wheateron's plays are so famous that some people now write wheateresque. You know, after the playwright wheateron."

produced by a female speaker of Australian English.

You can listen to this sentence: wheateron.wav

Some further information on this data is as follows:-

  1. pstart (column 2) and pend (column 3) show the approximate start and end palatograms for each word. So for example the first word, 'Kate', starts near palatogram 1 and ends near palatogram 62.
  2. The palatograms occur every 5 ms (milliseconds) and so the ending time (end) i the same as pend but multiplied by 5. The starting time is (pstart x 5) - 5. Five ms is subtracted from the start time as (pstart x 5) is the time at the end of that palatogram and we are interested in the time at the start of that palatogram (5 ms earlier). For example, since the next word, 'wheateron's' starts at palatogram 63, its start time in ms is (5 x 63) - 5 = 310 ms. You will note that this means that the start of each word is one palatogram after the end of the preceding word, but is at the same point in time in milliseconds as the end of the preceding word.
  3. The penultimate column dur is the duration in milliseconds of each word (so the difference between end and start).
no. pstart pend start end dur word
1 1 62 0 310 310 kate
2 63 170 310 850 540 wheateron's
3 171 242 850 1210 360 plays
4 243 252 1210 1260 50 are
5 253 300 1260 1500 240 so
6 301 423 1500 2115 615 famous
7 424 463 2115 2315 200 that
8 464 512 2315 2560 245 some
9 513 568 2560 2840 280 people
10 569 625 2840 3125 285 now
11 626 701 3125 3505 380 write
12 702 850 3505 4250 745 wheateresque
13 851 1168 4250 5840 1590 # (pause)
14 1169 1186 5840 5930 90 you
15 1187 1237 5930 6185 255 know
16 1238 1319 6185 6595 410 # (pause)
17 1320 1372 6595 6860 265 after
18 1373 1389 6860 6945 85 the
19 1390 1505 6945 7525 580 playwright
20 1506 1514 7525 7575 50 # (pause)
21 1515 1630 7575 8150 575 wheateron

Results

Click here to view the waveform for this utterance. Note that the time scale on the waveform is shown in seconds (top row: multiply this by 1000 to obtain milliseconds) and also as palatogram numbers (bottom row: palatogram samples at a rate of 200 per second or 5 ms apart). Also, the word boundaries (as quantified in the table above) are indicated by vertical red lines.

Click here to view the electropalatograms for this utterence. Note that only every second palatogram (ie. odd numbered palatograms) is in this file and therefore the difference beween each adjacent pair of these palatograms is 10 ms rather than 5 ms (as it would have been if all palatograms had been supplied)..

2012 Workshop Questions

Click here to view the questions that you must answer for this workshop.

You should print out this document, answer the questions on the printed sheets, and attach the Linguistics Department assignment cover page to it. Please place a hardcopy of your assignment in the assignment box in the faculty undergraduate office on the ground floor of C3A. If, and only if, you are unable to deliver it to the university (this should only affect some distance students) then scan it as a black and white image (not colour) and email the scanned pages directly to Robert Mannell.